Posts Tagged ‘hats’

Our Steampunk Fantasy…

Posted by Winifred on June 4th, 2014  •  No Comments »

Though you may have uncovered it on our Pinterest boards, we have mostly kept our love for steampunk a secret. A sci fi fantasy in Victorian settings with a steam power bent to it, steampunk matches the elegance we love in fashion and our enjoyment of hardware. There is a gorgeous femininity to it, with a powerful, almost villainous slant. The kind of duality we live for.

For us it starts with the hats. Feathers, lace…

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Flowers, not too sweet, more than a hint of darkness,

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Veils, even while fronting a bit of masculinity,

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Well crafted jackets, fitted equestrian or military in theme,

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And the very regal, sensational, unexpected, theatrical skirts,

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We rarely gravitate towards the standard brown of steampunk,
though we love it for the boys,

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We find steampunk almost a more true and effective statement in color,

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We like the fashion part of steampunk softer, more feminine, graceful, Edwardian,
but delight in surprising with a stronger shoe…

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Perhaps we’ll take our hat, fitted jacket, full skirt
(our steampunk fantasy includes a hand fan)
and tuck into an adventure.

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We see the makings of our next treasure hunt…

Images Via Pinterest, Data Mancer, Dezeen, DeviantArt, Propstore

Posted in : Travel, Vintage Fashion  •  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How we came to love the hat….

Posted by Winifred on April 28th, 2014  •  No Comments »

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It seems timely to go over what it means for a little girl to discover her first role model and how the very existence thereof forever informs her life…

We were probably 7, maybe 8. Born and raised in the Netherlands, we also lived in Spain and then spent several years in Suriname, where our parents were born. After Suriname, we returned to the Netherlands. It was still an innocent time, few outside influences, a culture of little television, few magazines and we were too young for peer pressure. No outside world telling you you weren’t good enough. In fact, in our house, being an outsider was what we celebrated. Our parents spoke Surinaams, we ate Surinaams, we adhered to our culture of respect for elders, family values, entertaining big and celebrating big. Oen mek presirie, always. Dutch culture was for us often a bit of a joke. We couldn’t be more thrilled to be Surinaams, even as we recognized the greater opportunities for education and earnings potential of Holland.

Then, already cocooned by our Surinaams family, we allowed one snippet of influence to come into our home. That snippet was our first glimpse of Miss Diana Ross on Dutch Television. At that time, it took quite a while for American imports to reach Europe. We had never heard of ‘Mahogany,’ and were too young to know the Supremes. So our first introduction to Miss Diana Ross was in the much later part of her career. There she was, thin, brown, with big eyes and big hair. She was beautiful, she was famous, she was glamorous, she was rich. She was a big star and everybody loved her. And she looked like us. And in that instant we were programmed. To be thin, brown, have big eyes and big hair was the ultimate in beauty, fame and possibilities. We would never want to be anything else, but what we were: the Surinaams version of that very image.

It seems so timely to share this now, as we notice how often attempts are made to shake that programming. Whether in the media, or sometimes closer to home. And we feel bad for the many people impacted, young girls especially. It reminds us how lucky we are to have received the gift of Miss Ross, but also of our parents. First, the gift of parents who gave us so solid a foundation and connection to our roots that in a time when the Netherlands was not so multicultural, we never questioned the richness of who we were. And second, that before society was able to work on us, in came Miss Ross to forever sear in our minds, an image of beauty, glamour, elegance and style that ’till this day continues to inform, inspire and guide us.

When asked how she manages the negativity of the press, Venus Williams responded that she had from her birth been brainwashed by parents who only told her she was amazing and could achieve anything she wanted. She has no ability to think anything else. We could not be more grateful for being brainwashed…

Vintage

Image Via Villagevoice

Posted in : Beauty Refined, Head wear, In an Ideal World..., We digress  •  Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

For Fall 2014, The Frontiers Woman Look

Posted by Winifred on February 19th, 2014  •  No Comments »

We would not have thought ourselves particularly fond of cowgirl themes either in fashion or otherwise. But many designers were inspired by it for Fall, and somehow it grew on us, slowly worming its way into our subconscious, driving us to inexplicably copy the look and then love it. It was our first foray, let’s see if it continues in the months before and during Fall…

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And then this,

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Tamara Mellon, Kenneth Cole, Alexander Wang, Cushnie et Ochs, Calla, VisVim

Images Via, Style

Posted in : On Style  •  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Isabella Blow

Posted by Winifred on October 3rd, 2013  •  No Comments »

They could not be less alike. One a hollywood legend, graceful, quiet, a reclusive film star; the other an exuberant, over-the-top, highly visible, visionary promoter of talent. They were of different eras, different walks of life, of a different style. We watched Irene Dunne in ‘The Awful Truth,’ her hats big dramatic, commanding, and original statements,

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but worn with the effortlessness and nonchalance of a baseball cap. As if they were a mere coincidence or an afterthought. And we immediately thought of the one person who could pull off even bigger, more commanding creations. Not just a wearer of hats, Isabella Blow was the signature of the hat. She was self expression through hats.

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And as we look more closely, Isabella Blow and Irene Dunne shared not just an ability to own a theatrical hat, but they shared generosity, a commitment to ideas and causes they believed in and a spirit that for those who knew them, had impact and endured. Hats off to that…

Images via Buzzfeed

Posted in : Classic Films, Head wear, Vintage Fashion  •  Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

In praise of the hat…

Posted by Winifred on December 13th, 2012  •  No Comments »

A Stolen Life

There are three obsessions we have not yet shared with you:  Hats, Bette Davis, and classic films.  We love it how all three come together in the beautiful stylings of Orry Kelly in A Stolen Life. There is the structure, the texture and the angles.

A Stolen Life

A dramatic look, made all the more dramatic by expressive eyes that deliver as much of the dialogue as anything else…we are obsessed with that. We will share more of that.

Posted in : On Style  •  Tags: , ,